Cimarron National Grassland

Forts, Settlements, & Museums

Clark County Historical Society - Pioneer-Krier Museum, Ashland, KS

The Museum concentrates on telling the history of the local area. It presents samples of those things used by pioneer families in daily living in this cattle grazing country. Furnishings range from a country store with its cracker barrel and array of merchandise, to collections of fossils, stones, and barb wire.

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Mid-America Air Museum, Liberal, KS

With more than 90 aircraft on display, the Mid-America Air Museum in Liberal, Kansas, is one of the largest aviation museums in the United States. 

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Kiowa County Historical Museum & Soda Fountain, Greensburg, KS

Kiowa County Historical Museum in Greensburg, Kansas showcases a completely renovated Hunter Drug Soda Fountain. A full functioning old-time soda fountain where you can enjoy a handmade soda or ice cream treat. Sit down at the counter - get whisked into the past as a soda-jerk creates your very own item.

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National Foundation for Carnival Heritage Center, Kinsley, KS

The Carnival Heritage Center in Kinsley, Kansas preserves the traditions of the family carnival, salutes famous carnival individuals and provides a nostalgic look at a form of entertainment from a simpler time in American life.

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Historic Adobe Museum, Ulysses, KS

The Grant County Museum is housed in a handmade adobe structure built for a county shop in the 1930s as a WPA project. The museum is now on the State Register of Historic Places. The museum chronicles county and area history from mastodons to gas wells. Its emphasis is on the Santa Fe Trail, Jedediah Smith and Wagonbed Springs. Also included in the Museum Complex is a historic hotel and one-room schoolhouse.

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Battle Canyon, Scott County, KS

Battle Canyon is where the last Indian battle in Kansas was fought. Punished Woman’s Fork, it is about a mile south of Lake Scott State Park on Hwy 95. A monument overlooks a cave, a canyon, and the bluffs where The Northern Cheyenne hid, waiting to ambush the U.S. Cavalry.

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Battle of Coon Creek, Edwards County, KS

Indian attacks along the Santa Fe Trail were frequent from the 1820's to the 1870's. Near Kinsley, where the trail followed the Arkansas River, the Battle of Coon Creek was fought June 18, 1848, between some 200 Comanche’s and Osage and 140 soldiers, half of whom were recruits bound for service in the Mexican war. A startling occurrence after the inconclusive battle, according to the official report, was the appearance of an Indian woman "who seemed to be their queen, mounted on horse, decorated with silver ornaments on a scarlet dress, who rode about giving directions about the wounded." The identity of this angel of mercy has remained a mystery.

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Fort Larned, Larned, KS

In a time of change and conflict, Fort Larned was on the front lines. The fort's mission began to protect the mail, grew to support the protection of other traffic on the Santa Fe Trail, culminated in Hancock's War and the Medicine Lodge Treaty in 1867, then ended with the completion of the railroad in less than two decades. Fort Larned is located directly on the Dry Route of the Santa Fe Trail, which follows the Pawnee Fork. The Wet Route, which more closely follows the Arkansas River, is just a few miles to the south. George Armstrong Custer and the newly-organized 7th U.S. Cavalry encamped at Fort Larned before and during their campaigns against the Cheyenne in 1867 and 1868. Custer's first experience dealing with Plains Indians occurred at Fort Larned. Today Fort Larned remains the best-preserved fort of its time.
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Boot Hill Museum, Dodge City, KS

Live the Legend of the West at Boot Hill Museum. Boot Hill Museum is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of the history of Dodge City and the Old West.

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Dalton Gang Hideout & Museum, Meade, KS

A modest house and barn on a cottonwood shaded hill are home to an Old West legend. Notorious for robbing trains and banks, the Dalton Gang created a hideout in Meade and built an escape tunnel from the home of their sister, Eva Whipple, to the barn some 95 feet away where their horses could carry them away undetected by the law. The Whipple house, escape tunnel and barn museum have been preserved and are all open to the public. Viewing the tunnel provides a sense of adventure that appeal to all ages.

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